Biden will become president

Joe Biden is to become president of the United States on Wednesday, Jan. 20. Nothing from President Trump’s impassioned video posted on Facebook last week will change that.  

A recent article in Axios quotes 31 Republican congresspersons and governors who have accepted Biden’s victory. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee was particularly poignant, “…my hope is that President Trump will take pride in his considerable accomplishments, put country first and have a prompt and orderly transition to help the new administration succeed.”

A recent Washington Post poll found only two Republican members of Congress willing to say Trump won the election. Twenty-seven said Biden won; 202 refused to answer.

Courts rejected five more lawsuits last Friday. According to the advocacy group Democracy Docket, Trump’s team has now lost 46 post-election lawsuits. Perhaps a dozen are still pending, but none are expected to succeed.

Many Trump supporters will find this hard to accept. They’ve heard accounts of bags of good ballots being ignored, of a truckload of false ballots being transported into a state, of election employees rigging computers, and of international operatives coordinating massive vote rigging.

None of this, however, is found in the Trump lawsuits. I’ve found only one election lawsuit filed by Trump’s team that claimed fraud, and that case in Michigan was withdrawn–possibly because lawyers can be disbarred for lying in court.

Most complaints were about technicalities in election processes.

For instance, the Trump administration filed a legal action in Wisconsin last Tuesday that  seeks to disqualify 170,140 absentee ballots because there is no request in print, i.e. the voter requested the absentee ballot online or voted during the early voting period. (The lawsuit covers only two counties with Democratic majorities. Apparently, it’s okay to have different rules where Republicans won.)

The state accepted the requests and mailed ballots–and now those votes are to be discarded? Ballots have long been separated from the signed certification envelopes.  How could they even be identified now?

Others lawsuits complained about how the signatures on the envelopes were authenticated and whether voters should have been allowed to validate questionable ballots in person.

Several legal actions complained that Republican observers were not allowed close enough to actually read the ballots being counted. Some states claimed that  was because of COVID restrictions, but Democratic observers in Canyon County have been kept much farther than six feet away.

The only case the Trump team has clearly won kept the Pennsylvania secretary of state from extending the deadline for receiving ballots postmarked by Nov. 3 from being accepted after Nov. 6.

President Trump’s latest tactic has been to pressure legislatures to appoint Republican presidential electors in spite of the majority of voters supporting Joe Biden.  Michigan turned him down. A state senator in Pennsylvania is pushing for such action. Georgia’s state law does not allow its legislature that option so Trump’s team recently filed a lawsuit asking for a new election unless the Republican legislature is allowed to choose electors.

 A few weeks ago I might have sided with those that believe President Trump is continuing to fight because his claims of fraud are bringing in hefty donations. Now, I think it is genuinely possible that he plans to remain in power. I see that as the only explanation for Attorney General William Barr, who acted as a faithful Trump employee until last week, to change directions and denounce the President’s claims of election fraud.

I hope the President’s supporters seriously consider whether a second term for Trump is worth destroying belief in the power of the vote.

Note: This is the first of my blogs to have inserted links.