Politics: Obama One of Many

“But my firm belief that [the President] is a dedicated conscious agent of the Communist conspiracy is based on…detailed evidence so extensive and so palpable [as] to put this conviction beyond any reasonable doubt…There is only one possible word to describe his purposes and his actions. That word is treason.”

[The President] “criticized the Supreme Court’s legal reasoning during a State of the Union address, which many considered a dangerous precedent as it appeared to place political pressure on the court, violating the Constitution’s separation of powers.”

One cannot forget [the President’s] “passion for partisan persecution, his lack of concern for basic civil liberties, and a self-righteousness that becomes at times out-and-out ruthlessness.”

Without doubt, [the President] is “a fascist dictator.”

[The President’s] “failed approach to foreign policy has…put America in a perilous position in the world…Whether it’s the Middle East, Iran or North Korea, [his] track record…is nothing to brag about…”

Did you grasp that the quotes above are about different presidents? Only the second one—the President exerting political pressure on the Supreme Court—is about President Obama.

The “agent of the Communist conspiracy” was Dwight D. Eisenhower.  On-line references cite `the interstate highway system, tax rates up to 90% on personal income, and the entire 1976 Republican platform as evidence that Ike was a Communist.  I remember, however, a pamphlet claiming that Eisenhower had been groomed since childhood to be the first Communist president.  His advancement to five-star general and leader of the Allied Forces had been orchestrated by Russia and partially repaid by his refusal, despite direct orders, to send American troops into Berlin ahead of the Russian Army.

The president accused of “partisan persecution” and failure to respect “basic civil liberties” was Thomas Jefferson.  Theodore Roosevelt believed Jefferson guilty of “cowardly infamy” for failing to prevent the British capture of Washington, D.C., of “torturous intrigues” against George Washington, and of being a “slippery demagogue.”  Jefferson’s contemporary critics used far worse language in accusing him of having a Negro slave as mistress.

The “fascist dictator” was Franklin D. Roosevelt.  Okay, the quote was too brief to give a strong clue—especially since FDR is more frequently accused of being a socialist.  (Fascists are pro-corporate and socialists, pro-state.)

And the president who put is in a perilous position in the Middle East was Jimmy Carter, who actually managed to get Egypt and Israel to sign a peace accord before the fiasco in Iran.

Every president faces harsh criticism.  The first political joke I ever heard was, “The three most hated men in U.S. history are the one that shot Lincoln and the two who missed Truman.”

Lincoln himself faced harsh criticism for conduct of the war and for freeing slaves in rebelling territories.  (The Emancipation Proclamation was an executive order issued without even advance notice to Congress.)  His successor Andrew Johnson was impeached for treating the surrendered Southern states too well.

Bill Clinton was accused of the murder of Vince Foster, illegal firing of White House Travel personnel, and political abuse of FBI files, before being impeached for lying about his conduct with Monica Lewinski.

And one can find copies of the 1963 wanted poster accusing John F. Kennedy of treason on the Internet. Among other things, JFK was accused of supporting anti-Christian decisions by the Supreme Court, sending Federal troops into a sovereign state, and “turning the sovereignty of the United States over to the communist-controlled United Nations.”

So pardon me if I don’t take right-wing rhetoric as evidence that Barrack Obama is the worst president ever and deserving of impeachment or criminal charges.  “Those who don’t learn history are condemned to repeat it.”